Septic System Repair Westchase

As a septic system owner, you may want to try your best to stay septic safe. This is more important if you are around the opening of the septic tank. As a matter of fact, you should know all of the important safety precautions that should be taken prior to working on the septic system.

Follow the safety tips given below:

1. Septic tank lid
Make sure that the access port of your tank is covered with a solid lid. Make sure that the lid is strong enough. Kids should not be able to open it. If you have no idea as to how to install the system, you can call a professional for help. The company will be more than happy to help with the inspection.

2. The tank opening
You should never lean over the septic tank opening. The reason is that the gasses that come out of the tank may knock you out. You may also fall in the tank, which may prove fatal.

3. Driving Over The septic system
Driving heavy machine on the ground where the tank system is buried is not a good idea. Actually, you may have to bear heavy costs in order to get the broken pipes repaired. So, make sure you don’t drive heavy equipment or machinery on the ground where you buried the tank system.

Contact Info:
Name: Billy Fowler
Email: info@asapadvancedseptic.com
Organization: ASAP Advanced Septic & Drainage, Inc.
Address: 5011 E Busch Blvd, Tampa, FL 33617
Phone: (813) 986-6070

Septic Shock, Bacteremia or Blood Infection

septic tank proper care

A lot of rural homes are not linked to a mains sewer system. These houses count on a self-contained sewage treatment plant called a septic system. If you have a septic tank, or are thinking about the purchase of a house with one, there are life-saving facts you need to know about septic tanks. A sewage-disposal tank takes the sewage from your house, the solids settle out and grease drifts to the top. In between the two layers is a clear watery layer that is piped away to an absorption area where it is permitted to percolate away, through the soil. Soil germs break down any nutrients before the sewage reaches the water bearing rocks, or any streams. Septic tanks are typically buried in the ground. There are 3 main types, all of which cause various issues. Steel tanks rust, specifically when buried in the ground. A steel septic system can be so corroded that it can result in somebody walking over it falling through and into the tank. The unlucky person is suffocated by the methane generated in the tank, or drowns. Concrete tanks may be damaged internally, resulting in long-term and costly to remedy damage to the absorption drain-field. The worst tanks are those developed from concrete blocks on website. In some cases the blocks are simply laid and not sealed together. Even if they are sealed together years of attack from acidic sewage will dissolve the mortar. These tanks can collapse without warning and probably fail to fulfill regional preparation and environmental management guidelines. How do you tell if your septic system has issues? , if there are ANY locations of sunken ground around it STAY AWAY.. Hire a contractor right away. Into the septic tank and pass away if you step on these locations you could fall through. These are indications that your septic tank has partly collapsed. Check for signs of strong sewage material in the drain-field area. This can be really expensive to rectify if the drain-field has been infected because the septic tank has not been pumped out regularly. If you are buying a house with a septic tank, you must insist on the tank being drained and an examination by a sewage-disposal tank specialist carried out. It is not possible to examine a septic tank appropriately while it is complete. You may need to spend for a contractor to provide you a report, however this will be a tiny quantity compared to the expense of any required restorative work A septic tank takes the sewage from the house, the solids settle out and grease drifts to the top. Steel tanks rust, especially when buried in the ground. A steel septic tank can be so corroded that it can lead to someone walking over it falling through and into the tank. If you step on these areas you might fall through, into the septic tank and pass away. These are signs that your septic tank has actually partially collapsed.

 

Cesspool Inspection When Buying a House

Poly Septic Tank

Bio-Clean Review

I hate plunging! I always feel icky and dirty after doing so.

The water from the toilet splashes all over, no matter how careful I may be. I always feel that I get at least some water on my pants making me feel as if I have to throw them immediately into the washer.

Even washing up immediately afterwards does not always make me feel clean and I feel as if I have to change all my clothes and take a full shower!

Then there's the plunger that must be rinsed off in the tub, then allowed to dry out and put back away. After doing so, I feel as if I have to once again wash my hands.

Then when you consider that you may wish to use the same plunger on different drains, such as the one in the bathroom or even in the kitchen sink, it becomes a pretty unsanitary condition.

What's worse, plunging all too often doesn't work! Or at least it doesn't work very well. True, it works to relieve mild stoppages. But it is pretty ineffective against major clogs.

Plungers Don't Always Work That Well

Take the act of trying to use a plunger in the toilet. Even a heavy duty, plumber style plunger doesn't always work all that well.

We have the type of plunger with the extra cup that pulls out from the bottom for a better fit. But it still doesn't fit the toilet well enough to create a very good suction.

The reason for this is plain to see: the plunger is perfectly round, or circular, while the opening in the toilet is oval-shaped. This means that it is not possible to form a very good seal where the plunger meets the opening.

We had a problem with our upstairs bathroom a couple weeks ago. The toilet after flushing did not always clear all of its contents. It was annoying to see this and wonder "did we flush or not?" We certainly had but it just hadn't all gone down.

So we tried plunging it, with all the mess and hassle described above. But still, it didn't seem to work very well. This was one clog that plunging just didn't seem to want to fix!

We tried going to the hardware store to see what else was available in the way of plungers. In addition to the standard plungers, we saw one plastic plunger that was shaped like a bellows and looked like it might be a bit better. But it was round and made of hard plastic and we knew that it wouldn't conform any better to the shape of the toilet drain than any other plunger.

We Noticed Problems With Our Drains

There were other problems with our drain. In fact, it was getting worse. When we ran the sink in the upstairs bathroom, we would sometimes hear a "bloop, bloop, bloop!" sound coming from the toilet. This indicated that there were air bubbles in the system that were not able to go through right away because of some kind of blockage.

When I was taking a shower, the water was starting to collect around my ankles because it was not draining properly. This despite the fact that the drain was open and there were no hairs blocking the outlet. Finally, whatever air bubble was blocking the system cleared itself and the water began to drain, but this took about ten minutes. Perhaps the warm water softened the blockage somewhere and allowed it to go down.

Obviously, some blockage was affecting all three drains in the upstairs bathroom-the sink, the toilet and the tub. This is because all three drains empty into the same sewer line.

(I am not saying the toilet water could back up into the tub or could even come out through the faucet in the sink! It's just that the blockage was lower down, where all three drains empty into the sewer line. This would explain why all three drains were exhibiting similar problems.)

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Other Problems

This is not the first time we’ve had a problem with our drains. In one instance, the blockage in the toilet had been nearly complete. This was so severe it called for running a steel snake down into the toilet to try to clear it.

Alas! This caused more problems than it solved. The action of the snake damaged a presumably plastic drain pipe inside the system. The result? The next time someone took a shower, water dripped from the ceiling down onto the living room floor!

We had to call a plumber in to correct this mess. This meant an expensive plumber's bill as well as money needed to repair the damaged ceiling in the living room. The ceiling was never quite as good as new, and you can still see signs of the episode to this day.

What was the culprit in this mess? The plumber found a wad of dental floss in the sewer line. Someone had been disposing of dental floss in the toilet, something we later read should never be done and which we stopped doing immediately.

Unfortunately, it was too late! The damage was already done. The dental floss, instead of going down, had accumulated in the system, forming a permanent blockage.

The moral of the story? Never, ever dispose of dental floss in the toilet! Always dispose of it in the trash instead.

Back to our current problem, the drains were obviously running slow and plunging didn’t work! We could try using chemical drain cleaner, but we were very wary of doing this, since we know how fragile the pipes are and we certainly did not want a repeat of our earlier episode! So what to do?

Enter Bio-Clean

Fortunately, the plumber we had called about the dental floss problem recommended a great product called Bio-Clean.

What is Bio-Clean? It's a bacteria culture in a can, what is called “friendly bacteria,” that is harmless to people and plumbing but that actually eats biodegradable wastes, the cause of most stoppages.

You may be saying to yourself, what the heck is "friendly bacteria?" I know it sounds kind of weird, sort of like a science experiment that you carry out in your own home. The fact is that bacteria, or at least certain forms of it, has a very friendly relationship with what our bodies consider "waste."

Bacteria is used in municipal sanitation plants to break down sewer waste into harmless components so that the water can be returned to the ecosystem. Living creatures like humans have trillions of bacteria in their guts that help with the digestive process. So, bacteria and biodegradable materials have a very close relationship, and this has been so for millions of years.

How does this help you with your drains? Well, as time goes on and you use your drains, waste begins to accumulate on the inside surfaces of the pipes in your sewer system.

How Bio-Clean Works

It’s something like a blockage of the arteries. As a waste accumulates, it forms a thicker and thicker layer that eventually reduces the size of your sewer openings to a very small diameter. This causes slower and slower drains until, eventually, you must start plunging or use a caustic drain cleaner.

The problem is these methods don’t always work very well, as previously discussed.

The plunger attempts to use the force of suction to physically clear the blockage, but it’s impossible to totally clear months or years of accumulation. The drain opener gets more to the source of the problem, but it can be seriously bad for your bathroom pipes.

That’s where Bio-Clean comes in. The "friendly bacteria" in Bio-Clean love the substances that we consider waste and blockages and they literally eat it up! Yet they are 100% harmless to living or nonbiological substances such as the pipes themselves.

Look at a cross-section of a clogged pipe, and you will see years of accumulated slime piled up around the inner surfaces. This is what the bacteria in Bio-Clean consumes.

They feed, multiply and eat their way through all waste matter until it is all eaten up. They chemically change it into water, carbon and other harmless elements that are used by plant life and run right out of the waste system.

Where does Bio-Clean work?

Where does Bio-Clean work? In all the following areas:

Kitchen sinks

Lavatories

Bathtubs

Showers

Floor Drains

Laundry Drains

Garbage Disposals

Septic Tanks and Fields

Rv and Boat Holding Tanks

You can even add it to cat litter

What Are the Alternatives to Bio-Clean?

Compare Bio-Clean to mechanical equipment. As we discovered, cables can poke holes through the pipe. At best, they only leave a small opening through the mess which only leaves a base for new waste to adhere to.

Hot, caustic drain openers actually become diluted and weaker as they travel down through the pipes. They cannot defy gravity. They can only settle in a concentrated area or become weaker as they go down.

But the Bio-Clean family of friendly bacteria can digest vegetation and animal waste. They can defy gravity. They can work their way up as well as down!

It is important to note that Bio-Clean cannot repair broken pipes or mechanical defects or digest inorganic material such as baby toys or dental floss, as we discovered in our own drain. However, Bio-Clean will work for most normal blockages.

How do you use Bio-Clean?

How do you use Bio-Clean? Bio-Clean comes to you as an inert powder containing the bacteria culture, amylase, protease, cellulase and lipase enzymes.

The bacteria are in a state of "suspended animation," I guess you could say, (sort of like the old Sea Monkeys) but they "come to life" when they are added to water. You merely add a tablespoon full to your drains when they will be undisturbed for 6 to 8 hours, such as at nighttime. To give it the fullest time to work, repeat the treatment for five consecutive days.

In the instance of our clogged bathroom drain, we added it to both the toilet and the shower drain for one week.

What was the result? The sink drain no longer goes "bloop, bloop, bloop!"when we are running the water. The toilet flushes perfectly every time with no need for repeated flushings. The shower drains like when it was new. All this with no messy plunging or caustic chemicals!

Advantages of Bio-Clean

Bio-Clean may be a slight inconvenience for large families or households with only one bathroom since, for best results, it should be applied for five consecutive days. However, you can avoid even this slight inconvenience, once you get your drains cleared, simply by applying it once a month to all drains as a maintenance schedule. This will keep clogs from building up in the first place with minimal inconvenience.

Bio-Clean is also economical. A single can contains up to 100 drain treatments or will treat a 1000 US gallon septic tank.

I highly recommend Bio-Clean. It can replace plungers, caustic drain cleaners and even expensive plumber's bills. If it saves you one trip from the plumber, it will have paid for a lifetime of Bio-Clean!

Make friends with the friendly bacteria of Bio-Clean and you may never have to suffer from slow or clogged drains again!

Tips for Bio-Clean - Here are some handy tips to aid you in your use of Bio-Clean.

  1. In the Bio-Clean instructions, it says, "On multi-story buildings start initial treatment on the lowest level (e.g. basement) and progress to the top. Complete the five-day treatment on one floor before going on to the next higher floor." Tip: If the drains on the lower floors are running and have good flow you do not have to start on the lowest floor.
  2. In the Bio-Clean instructions, it says that "mouthwash should be disposed of into toilet." Tip: This refers not only to the 6 to 8 hours at bedtime when the drain is being treated but for the entire 5 to 6 consecutive days of drain treatment. You need to dispose of mouthwash this way during the entire 5 day treatment because Bio-Clean can continue working even after the sinks are being used again. Mouthwash, however, contains antibacterial agents that can destroy the residual action of Bio-Clean.
  3. Tip: Even though Bio-Clean can serve as an alternative to plunging, you can get better, faster results by doing an occasional plunging while using bio clean. This is because plunging can help break up the built-up wastes lining the pipes that Bio-Clean has loosened. This can give you faster and more complete results in clearing your drain blockages.

Safety Tips For Working Around A Septic Tank System

Septic Tank Soakaway

Septic tank systems become clogged with roots in the leach lines, leach field, drain field or seepage field, causing backup of wastewater into the house. The inexpensive fix is to use copper sulfate through an installed cleanout or septic field pump.

Septic tank systems

Septic tank systems do not last forever and replacing one is a very expensive proposition. If your house is connected to the city sewer system, then you do not have a septic tank. A septic tank can be described as your very own little sewage treatment plant. There are three basic elements of a septic system:

  1. The septic line that carries sewage and waste water from your house to the tank. There is usually a cleanout plug at the house-end it so that you can run a snake down it to remove obstructions.
  2. The septic tank itself where sewage is held while undergoing decomposition. This is underground, probably under a grassy area, and has a cover that is usually buried in residential installations.
  3. The leach field, also referred to as a drain field or seepage field. This is a branching network of underground porous trenches, pipes or something similar that carries the clear liquid from the septic tank throughout adjacent soil where it is absorbed.

A clogged leach field

Eventually leach fields become clogged because the roots from trees and other vegetation are attracted to the nutrient-rich effluent. The roots grow through the pores intended to drain the liquid, seepage gradually slows or stops.

If sufficient pressure cannot be released through the pores of the leach field, the entire septic system cannot accept any more waste water and it backs up in the house, usually at a low point such as a shower or tub drain. If it gets that bad, you may have to replace the entire leach field. In many localities, that will require a building permit and meeting current building codes, which means replacing the entire septic system, which is expensive, etc.

Kill roots with copper sulfate

Since this is obviously something to avoid, you can often extend the life of the old system by taking action when sewage flow has slowed, but not completely stopped. Copper sulfate kills roots. If it can be placed into the system so that it will flow through the leach field, the roots will die (but not the plants) and waste water will begin to flow more freely again after a few weeks. In many systems, this isn’t as easy as it sounds, because copper sulfate is so heavy that it will settle to the bottom of the septic tank unless inserted into the leach line leading from the tank. If you have a cleanout or other access there, you’re all set, but many residential systems do not. I prefer the crystal form over the powder because it's easier to handle, cheaper and dissolves more slowly, .

Install a leach line cleanout

If necessary, it is not very expensive to have a cleanout installed in the leach line expressly for the purpose of adding copper sulfate periodically. If that still doesn’t quite work, or if you want to be sure the stuff is going to flow more quickly, you can pump it through the leach field.

It is possible to install a pump on the leach line cleanout between the septic tank and the leach field. It can be buried below ground level or installed above ground and concealed with landscape bushes. The pump turns on and off automatically to maintain a slight pressure on the waste water, pushing it through the pores of the seepage field. Adding copper sulfate at intervals through a cleanout at this point is effective to drive the chemical towards the offending roots.

Killing the roots may extend the life of the septic system a few years, but it will ultimately need to be replaced with a completely modern one—unless you can successfully lobby for a neighborhood hook-up, of course.

Safety Tips For Working Around A Septic Tank System

Septic Tank Plan

As a home inspector, I hear complaints from real estate agents every week about septic system failures. The story always goes like this. The buyer loved the home. The inspector suggested there may be a problem with the septic system. The buyer ignored the inspector's warnings and bought anyway. And the buyer ends up with a home that is ruined with seeping sewage within just a few years.

It is easy to blame the seller in this situation, and believe that he intentionally misrepresented the home.

This is often unfair to the seller, who does not know any better than the buyer that the septic system is on its last legs at the time of the sale. However, this does not change the sad fact that the buyer, who is already leveraged on an expensive home (particularly in New Jersey, where annual property taxes normally run in the tens of thousands of dollars), then has a septic repair job on their hands that costs several thousand dollars.

7) If the seller refuses to be at the home on the day of the inspection, this is a red flag for consideration. Tell him you would like to keep him in the loop, and you would appreciate if he comes to every meeting.

Septic System Inspection: Money Well-Spent

For both the buyer and the seller, the cost of a septic system inspection is well worth the money. The buyer gets peace of mind knowing he will not have to replace his septic system at a moment's notice. Also, the seller protects himself from a lawsuit, as the contractors he hires become the targets for litigation.

So, these are a few precautions that you may want to take if you are going to work on a septic tank system. This is important should you want to keep you and your family safe around the system. When in doubt, it’s a good idea to call a local septic service in Westchase . Hopefully, these tips will help.

SEPTIC TANK CARE | WHO TO CALL FOR SERVICE IN Westchase

While having a septic system at home is great, it is also a big responsibility. You need to get your pump cleaned every two or three years depending on various factors. This should be done so that the whole system works smoothly and you won't have to keep repairing or even replacing the tank.

Important Factors to Consider

Lifestyle: The two major lifestyle factors that affect the septic system are the age of people living in the house and the amount of water that is used at home. Age is an important factor because houses with young children and growing families often use a lot more water and they don't really watch what is being put down the drains. On the other hand, older people, especially couples living on their own, often do not use as much water. So when there is less water being used at home, less solid mater is put down the drain along with the water.

When you get your tank pumped, it is advisable to get it inspected as well. Most companies who offer septic services also have certified inspectors who will let you know if there is any damage to the septic system and if any repairs need to be conducted. If you can put in this little effort and ensure that the whole system is cleaned out and inspected occasionally, your septic tank won't only last you for years but it will also work smoothly and manage wastewater effectively.


Hillsborough Septic Tank Repair

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